Essay Topics
Types of Essays
Essay Checklist
Word Counter
Readability Score
Essay Rewriter
In the late 40s Herbert Feis, a United States State Department analysis, determined that a certain Arab nation in the Middle East has one of the greatest material prizes in world history: oil reserves. The United States government has bargained over $100 billion in military goods, services, and Cold War-era bases, compatible with U.S. needs, in exchange for the largest importation of this Arab oil from any other nation in the world. Since the end of World War II no other middle-eastern country has had more influence, connected more ties, or assimilated more partnerships with the United States than the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has. Though the Saudi Arabian nation has been established on the Arabian Peninsula since the early 18th century, King Abdul Aziz Bin Abdul Rahman Al-Saud founded modern Saudi Arabia on September 23, 1932 under the constitution of the Holy Koran. During King Abdul Aziz Bin Abdul Rahman Al-Sauds reign the nation began a long and prosperous period of economic growth, thanks in part to the discovery of vast oil supplies located throughout the Arabian Peninsula. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia comprises almost four-fifths of the Arabian Peninsula, an area approximately one-third the size of the continental United States, and contains Islamic Holy cities of Mecca and Medina. Today, Saudi Arabia is ruled by King Fahd bin Abdulaziz, who has been a strong political influence over neighboring Arab nations since his reign began. In 1988 he initiated talks to put an end to the Iraq-Iran conflict, and was one of the first members to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Also in 1990 during the Persian Gulf conflict, he supported U.S. military action in the country in exchange for assistance in protecting the Saudi territory from being taken over by Iraq. King Fahd bin Abdulaziz has also openly showed support and backing for the Palestinian cause during the last decade. Saudi Arabias current relationship with the U.S. is revolving around the terrorist attacks of September 11th, the need to bolster the Saudi economy, and constant U.S. demand for oil. In 2000 the Saudis supplied the United States with roughly 1.5 million barrels of oil per day (17% of all U.S. oil imports). In response the U.S. has provided Saudi Arabia with agricultural machinery, computer technology, and automobiles, aside from the usual furnishing of arms. The Saudi nation has been known to purchase large quantities of military weapons and M-1 tanks, especially after the Gulf War, to show to Congress and other governments worldwide that it is a major player in the scheme of globalization. In 1992 alone, the Saudi Kingdom bought $10 billion worth of F-15 fighter jets. Saudi Arabia has been more self-dependent than any other Arab country during the last few decades and has strong ally ties with Egypt and countries in Western Europe. Saudi Arabia is the worlds leading oil producer and uses most of that money towards its citizens to have medical care, free education, etc. The Saudis have no need for U.S. foreign aid or development projects and because of this fact, along with U.S. oil demand; Congress and the White House have turned a blind eye to the deep human rights issue within the nation. In 1998 large corporations, influential in both the U.S. and Saudi Arabia, came together to stop a bill that would have imposed sanctions on countries that persecute religious minorities. Only after a preamble that stated exclusion of Saudi Arabia and several other countries because of their current religious persecution investigations and a loophole that gave the President the right to waive sanctions in the event of national interest was added did the bill ultimately pass. Actions like these not only make the U.S. look like a humbled ally but also make the U.S. out to be a quite opponent of Saudi Arabia; even more so after the events of September 11th. The F.B.I., local authorities, and ordinary citizens have blamed many Saudi Americans for the recent attacks in New York and Washington. F.B.I. officials have questioned Sahim al- Shalaan, a Saudi Arabian student studying at Florida Atlantic University, repeatedly in the past few months: "The last time the F.B.I. came to me in Florida, I asked them to please tell the neighbors that I was O.K., that I had nothing to do with Sept. 11," Mr. Shalaan said. "Do you know what their answer was? `Deal with it.' " "Once, the F.B.I. came to my apartment and I was wearing clothes like this," he said, gesturing to his long white gown, standard attire for Saudi men. "They asked, `If I was in America, why was I wearing a dress?' " But Saudi citizens not only have to deal with the external conflicts with America, they also have to handle fundamentalist regimes within their own country. Many of these regimes are trying to overthrow King Fahd. Also Saudi Arabia has been mildly avoiding cooperation with U.S. officials with retrieval of records on 15 of the September 11th terrorists, all of which are Saudi-born, and with providing information on terrorist funding in the country, especially through Islamic charity organizations. The U.S. is not trying hard to obtain usage of Saudi military bases for Afghanistan attacks or trying to freeze Saudi funds of assumed terrorists linked to Osama bin Laden because of the fact that it will only fuel the internal regimes in Saudi Arabia to lash out at the Saudi monarchy. Currently about 8.7 million citizens in the Saudi Kingdom are 18 years old or younger: nearly half of the entire population. The nation has been the perfect breeding ground for terrorist activity in the past decade, especially in maintaining and recruiting foot soldiers for Holy Jihads. Many Saudi citizens have acted out against U.S. support for Israel by boycotting American stores and restaurants. The important question on many government officials minds is can the Saudi family withstand strong political instability from within its own national population? Washington and Riyadh will need to work out a cooperative plan in order for both of their respective countries to strengthen in the coming years. Saudi needs more political stability within its social system and the U.S. needs access to the oil reserves in Saudi Arabia. Even though Saudi Arabia has been working very slowly with the U.S. in its global war on terrorism, its a sensitive ordeal that must be understood by military eager politicians in America. One major obstacle that needs to be overcome is the constant U.S. pressure for more human rights through the Saudi nation. Saudi Arabia remains a land where rigid religious and traditional values are strictly enforced. Many analysts blame the Saudi government for constructing the means of the latest generation of Islamic militant fundamentalists. Currently Saudi Arabia is caught between U.S. pressure for assistance in its war on terrorism and the growing influence of Osama bin Laden followers with the countries youth population. Possible solutions for these struggles between the U.S. and Saudi Arabia include an immediate resolution of the Israel/Palestine conflict, a joint effort at denouncing Islamic radicalists in the Middle East, and a global reprisal against terrorism. The U.S. needs to recognize that Palestine needs a proper territory to call home that is both just and a product of negotiation with Israel. That would allow U.S. presence in the Saudi Kingdom to be more accepted and to show that the U.S. is more open and willing to accept Islamic values as a whole. There is already a strong foothold in Saudi Arabia for the breakdown of fundamentalist regimes. Less than 1 of out every 100 citizens desire a ruler that has been inspired by bin Laden because of the fear that Saudi Arabia could end up like Afghanistan with a Taliban-style ruling. The U.S. and Saudi Arabia need to communicate to the people of the Middle East that devote love for religion does not need to be expressed through Holy Jihads or a strict interpretation of the Koran. It needs to be expressed that this war is mistakenly justified by religious means and that the true agendas of both parties rest more on a political concept. A globally united counter-plan against such radical ideas would help show not only the Middle East but also countries around the world of what these surreal religious beliefs produce, with Afghanistan being a prime example. The U.S./Saudi Arabia relationship has last for more than 70 years and throughout those years there have been many situations come up which needed both U.S. and Saudi support to take care of them. Through compromising and understanding both countries will be able to pull though current struggles for a more beneficial future economically, socially, and religiously.
Essay Writing Checklist
The following guidelines are designed to give students a checklist to use, whether they are revising individually or as part of a peer review team.
Introduction
  • Is the main idea (i.e., the writer's opinion of the story title) stated clearly?
  • Is the introductory paragraph interesting? Does it make the reader want to keep on reading?
Body Paragraph
  • Does each body paragraph have a clear topic sentence that is related to the main idea of the essay?
  • Does each body paragraph include specific information from the text(including quoted evidence from the text, if required by the instructor)that supports the topic sentence?
  • Is there a clear plan for the order of the body paragraphs (i.e., order of importance, chronology in the story, etc.)?
  • Does each body paragraph transition smoothly to the next?
Conclusion
  • Is the main idea of the essay restated in different words?
  • Are the supporting ideas summarized succinctly and clearly?
  • Is the concluding paragraph interesting? Does it leave an impression on the reader?
Overall Essay
  • Is any important material left unsaid?
  • Is any material repetitious and unnecessary?
  • Has the writer tried to incorporate "voice" in the essay so that it has his/her distinctive mark?
  • Are there changes needed in word choice, sentence length and structure, etc.?
  • Are the quotations (if required) properly cited?
  • Has the essay been proofread for spelling, punctuation, grammar, etc.?
  • Does the essay have an interesting and appropriate title?
Essay on Saudi Arabia's Current Relationship with the United States
Trending Essay Topics
Explore today's trending essay topics:
Reference
Feel free to use content on this page for your website, blog or paper we only ask that you reference content back to us. Use the following code to link this page:
Terms · Privacy · Contact
Essay Topics © 2018

Essay On Saudi Arabia's Current Relationship With The United States

Words: 1463    Pages: 5    Paragraphs: 11    Sentences: 121    Read Time: 05:19
Highlight Text to add correction. Use an editor to spell check essay.
              In the late 40s Herbert Feis, a United States State Department analysis, determined that a certain Arab nation in the Middle East has one of the greatest material prizes in world history: oil reserves. The United States government has bargained over $100 billion in military goods, services, and Cold War-era bases, compatible with U. S. needs, in exchange for the largest importation of this Arab oil from any other nation in the world. Since the end of World War II no other middle-eastern country has had more influence, connected more ties, or assimilated more partnerships with the United States than the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has.
             
             
              Though the Saudi Arabian nation has been established on the Arabian Peninsula since the early 18th century, King Abdul Aziz Bin Abdul Rahman Al-Saud founded modern Saudi Arabia on September 23, 1932 under the constitution of the Holy Koran. During King Abdul Aziz Bin Abdul Rahman Al-Sauds reign the nation began a long and prosperous period of economic growth, thanks in part to the discovery of vast oil supplies located throughout the Arabian Peninsula. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia comprises almost four-fifths of the Arabian Peninsula, an area approximately one-third the size of the continental United States, and contains Islamic Holy cities of Mecca and Medina. Today, Saudi Arabia is ruled by King Fahd bin Abdulaziz, who has been a strong political influence over neighboring Arab nations since his reign began. In 1988 he initiated talks to put an end to the Iraq-Iran conflict, and was one of the first members to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Also in 1990 during the Persian Gulf conflict, he supported U. S. military action in the country in exchange for assistance in protecting the Saudi territory from being taken over by Iraq. King Fahd bin Abdulaziz has also openly showed support and backing for the Palestinian cause during the last decade.
             
              Saudi Arabias current relationship with the U. S. is revolving around the terrorist attacks of September 11th, the need to bolster the Saudi economy, and constant U. S. demand for oil. In 2000 the Saudis supplied the United States with roughly 1. 5 million barrels of oil per day (17% of all U. S. oil imports). In response the U. S. has provided Saudi Arabia with agricultural machinery, computer technology, and automobiles, aside from the usual furnishing of arms. The Saudi nation has been known to purchase large quantities of military weapons and M-1 tanks, especially after the Gulf War, to show to Congress and other governments worldwide that it is a major player in the scheme of globalization. In 1992 alone, the Saudi Kingdom bought $10 billion worth of F-15 fighter jets. Saudi Arabia has been more self-dependent than any other Arab country during the last few decades and has strong ally ties with Egypt and countries in Western Europe. Saudi Arabia is the worlds leading oil producer and uses most of that money towards its citizens to have medical care, free education, etc. The Saudis have no need for U. S. foreign aid or development projects and because of this fact, along with U. S. oil demand; Congress and the White House have turned a blind eye to the deep human rights issue within the nation.
             
              In 1998 large corporations, influential in both the U. S. and Saudi Arabia, came together to stop a bill that would have imposed sanctions on countries that persecute religious minorities. Only after a preamble that stated exclusion of Saudi Arabia and several other countries because of their current religious persecution investigations and a loophole that gave the President the right to waive sanctions in the event of national interest was added did the bill ultimately pass.
             
              Actions like these not only make the U. S. look like a humbled ally but also make the U. S. out to be a quite opponent of Saudi Arabia; even more so after the events of September 11th. The F. B. I. , local authorities, and ordinary citizens have blamed many Saudi Americans for the recent attacks in New York and Washington. F. B. I. officials have questioned Sahim al- Shalaan, a Saudi Arabian student studying at Florida Atlantic University, repeatedly in the past few months:
             
              "The last time the F. B. I. came to me in Florida, I asked them to please tell the neighbors that I was O. K. , that I had nothing to do with Sept. 11," Mr. Shalaan said. "Do you know what their answer was? `Deal with it. ' "
             
              "Once, the F. B. I. came to my apartment and I was wearing clothes like this," he said, gesturing to his long white gown, standard attire for Saudi men. "They asked, `If I was in America, why was I wearing a dress? ' "
             
              But Saudi citizens not only have to deal with the external conflicts with America, they also have to handle fundamentalist regimes within their own country. Many of these regimes are trying to overthrow King Fahd. Also Saudi Arabia has been mildly avoiding cooperation with U. S. officials with retrieval of records on 15 of the September 11th terrorists, all of which are Saudi-born, and with providing information on terrorist funding in the country, especially through Islamic charity organizations. The U. S. is not trying hard to obtain usage of Saudi military bases for Afghanistan attacks or trying to freeze Saudi funds of assumed terrorists linked to Osama bin Laden because of the fact that it will only fuel the internal regimes in Saudi Arabia to lash out at the Saudi monarchy. Currently about 8. 7 million citizens in the Saudi Kingdom are 18 years old or younger: nearly half of the entire population. The nation has been the perfect breeding ground for terrorist activity in the past decade, especially in maintaining and recruiting foot soldiers for Holy Jihads. Many Saudi citizens have acted out against U. S. support for Israel by boycotting American stores and restaurants. The important question on many government officials minds is can the Saudi family withstand strong political instability from within its own national population?
             
              Washington and Riyadh will need to work out a cooperative plan in order for both of their respective countries to strengthen in the coming years. Saudi needs more political stability within its social system and the U. S. needs access to the oil reserves in Saudi Arabia. Even though Saudi Arabia has been working very slowly with the U. S. in its global war on terrorism, its a sensitive ordeal that must be understood by military eager politicians in America. One major obstacle that needs to be overcome is the constant U. S. pressure for more human rights through the Saudi nation. Saudi Arabia remains a land where rigid religious and traditional values are strictly enforced. Many analysts blame the Saudi government for constructing the means of the latest generation of Islamic militant fundamentalists. Currently Saudi Arabia is caught between U. S. pressure for assistance in its war on terrorism and the growing influence of Osama bin Laden followers with the countries youth population.
             
              Possible solutions for these struggles between the U. S. and Saudi Arabia include an immediate resolution of the Israel/Palestine conflict, a joint effort at denouncing Islamic radicalists in the Middle East, and a global reprisal against terrorism. The U. S. needs to recognize that Palestine needs a proper territory to call home that is both just and a product of negotiation with Israel. That would allow U. S. presence in the Saudi Kingdom to be more accepted and to show that the U. S. is more open and willing to accept Islamic values as a whole. There is already a strong foothold in Saudi Arabia for the breakdown of fundamentalist regimes. Less than 1 of out every 100 citizens desire a ruler that has been inspired by bin Laden because of the fear that Saudi Arabia could end up like Afghanistan with a Taliban-style ruling. The U. S. and Saudi Arabia need to communicate to the people of the Middle East that devote love for religion does not need to be expressed through Holy Jihads or a strict interpretation of the Koran. It needs to be expressed that this war is mistakenly justified by religious means and that the true agendas of both parties rest more on a political concept. A globally united counter-plan against such radical ideas would help show not only the Middle East but also countries around the world of what these surreal religious beliefs produce, with Afghanistan being a prime example.
             
              The U. S. /Saudi Arabia relationship has last for more than 70 years and throughout those years there have been many situations come up which needed both U. S. and Saudi support to take care of them. Through compromising and understanding both countries will be able to pull though current struggles for a more beneficial future economically, socially, and religiously.
Saudi Arabia Essay 
Tip: Use our Essay Rewriter to rewrite this essay and remove plagiarism.

Add Notes

Have suggestions, comments or ideas? Please share below. Don't forget to tag a friend or classmate.
clear
Formatting Help
Submit